[OT] SBS pros/cons

Matt -

I would never recommend buying an SBS if you could afford buying all the
software components separately. I would also recommend keeping Vantage
running on a separate server. That way any maintenance on either SBS or
Vantage will not interrupt every network service (ie. Vantage, Outlook,
etc.). Also SBS, particularly Exchange, is a real memory-hog. When doing
the nightly live-backup, my night crew users could really feel Vantage drag
down. (Now, this probably has as much to do with its old server hardware as
it does with the SBS operating system.)

Of course this is all my "ideal network dream", not grounded in any form of
reality that most IT departments would be in.

Our network is running on an NT 4.0 SBS. You company is much the same size
as ours. I was finally able to convince the boss to get a new server
strictly for Vantage, and take it off of the SBS, and it has been kittens
and rainbows ever since.

Yes, the cost savings is huge by buying SBS, but you are also buying an
operating system that is a tightly woven bag of worms. For instance, we had
a company come in to install an Exchange Server interface. I told them that
it may not work with our SBS. They told me there should be no problem.
WRONG! It was almost a whole week of 18 hour days forcing the SBS to accept
this interface. Now I am afraid to breathe on it for it collapsing.

The fax server that is included in NT 4 SBS is really great, and we have
come to depend upon it. I don't know if it is included in current versions
of SBS.

Hope that helps.

Steven
Anyone running SBS (or not) I'd appreciated any feedback. I am
contemplating consolidating two NT servers into one SBS 2K3. I understand
some basic stuff: pro=big savings, easier administration and con=all eggs in
one basket, getting stuff we don't need (SQL). I don't believe in our 30
user environment that load will be an issue, we are running Exchange.
Vantage 5.2 DB = 1.45GB Exchange DB = 5.25GB Do you think this is a
good/bad idea?



Matt Finn






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Matt -

I would never recommend buying an SBS if you could afford buying all the
software components separately. I would also recommend keeping Vantage
running on a separate server. That way any maintenance on either SBS or
Vantage will not interrupt every network service (ie. Vantage, Outlook,
etc.). Also SBS, particularly Exchange, is a real memory-hog. When doing
the nightly live-backup, my night crew users could really feel Vantage drag
down. (Now, this probably has as much to do with its old server hardware as
it does with the SBS operating system.)

Of course this is all my "ideal network dream", not grounded in any form of
reality that most IT departments would be in.

Our network is running on an NT 4.0 SBS. You company is much the same size
as ours. I was finally able to convince the boss to get a new server
strictly for Vantage, and take it off of the SBS, and it has been kittens
and rainbows ever since.

Yes, the cost savings is huge by buying SBS, but you are also buying an
operating system that is a tightly woven bag of worms. For instance, we had
a company come in to install an Exchange Server interface. I told them that
it may not work with our SBS. They told me there should be no problem.
WRONG! It was almost a whole week of 18 hour days forcing the SBS to accept
this interface. Now I am afraid to breathe on it for it collapsing.

The fax server that is included in NT 4 SBS is really great, and we have
come to depend upon it. I don't know if it is included in current versions
of SBS.

Hope that helps.

Steven